Five Films Made Before 1910 That Deserve More Love

Excuse the bossy title but “I think you’ll really enjoy them because they surprised and delighted me” seemed a bit long. But that’s the gist of this post. I think 1910s cinema needs more love but pre-1910 is even more of a graveyard sometimes, except for Melies and some Edison. Well, let’s change that! Here are five films from the era that I think are worth your time.

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Silent Movies Spoofing Stage Melodramas (yes, including “tied to the tracks) or, I Love Being Right

One of the minor annoyances of being a silent film fan is having to hear people who have never seen silent films describe silent films. And invariably, it is something along the lines of “damsel tied to track by mustachioed villain” or maybe the old sawmill chestnut.

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“All the jokes can’t be good, you have to expect that sometimes!” Groan-Inducing Movie Magazine Humor from 1919

I was dipping into silent era film magazines once again and I came across this page of groaners in a 1919 issue of Film Fun Magazine. They’re too bad to keep to myself so let’s read them together and scratch our heads and grandmama’s sense of humor.

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Silent Stars in the Twilight Zone: Ernest Truex

A great many silent era stars, directors and other personnel enjoyed long careers after the talkies arrived, a fair number stuck around long enough to be television stars. Due to its anthology format, a new cast every week, The Twilight Zone was an unusually rich showcase for silent talent. (I have already discussed Joseph Schildkraut’s appearances on the show.)

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Silent (okay, Early Talkie) Movie Myth: “By William Shakespeare with Additional Dialogue by Sam Taylor”

I was catching up on my modern movie news and found that Disney is planning to “remake” their 1996 animated version of The Hunchback of Notre Dame. Part of the announcement was that the new film would be based on both the Victor Hugo novel and their cartoon version.

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