“Let us begin,” said Conrad Veidt. Animated GIF

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People do not clap nearly enough today. Let me rephrase. They clap at concerts or at that stupid team-building retreat they have to go on or at a play but they do not clap to summon their minions or as a signal to begin a fiendish plan of murder and mayhem.

Of course Conrad Veidt has a fiendish plan of murder and mayhem. Could you ever doubt it? (This is from The Last Performance. Read my review here.)

I shall conclude matters by just saying more more thing: “Hubba!”

Availability: The Last Performance is available on DVD and Blu-ray, packaged as an extra with the part-talkie, Lonesome.

You too can perfect Conrad Veidt’s “Look of Doom” in three easy lessons! Animated GIF

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No one does the death stare better than Conrad Veidt. No one. I mean, behold it in all its glory! I certainly would not like to be on the receiving end, let me tell you. When Mr. Veidt looks like this, what follows usually involves stabbing, maiming and feeding grown men to tigers. He could really give lessons. Here is a sample syllabus:

Lesson 1: Glowering, Grimacing and General Menace

Lesson 2: Cover Girl for the Grumpy Boy

Lesson 3: Glow! Maybe he was born with it, maybe it’s radioactivity

(This is from The Last Performance, you can read my review here.)

Coincidentally, it is also the look I get on my face when people say that they do not like silent movies because they are silent movies.

Where is my tiger pit?

Availability: The Last Performance is available on DVD and Blu-ray, packaged as an extra with the part-talkie, Lonesome.

The Last Performance (1929) A Silent Film Review

Conrad Veidt is an illusionist who is in love with his assistant. Unfortunately, she falls for another, leaving Veidt in the dust. Now what will he do about that? Did I mention that he has an act that involves stabbing a trunk (and the person inside) with twelve sharp swords? You know, I think this just might figure into the story at some point.
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