Silent Movie Trivia #17: The Winning of Barbara Worth (1926)

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The Winning of Barbara Worth is one of the high-quality epic westerns that were being produced in the 1920s. Director Henry King, always in his element with Americana, created an epic flood scene at the ending that still wows audiences. However, modern viewers will probably be most interested in Gary Cooper, who had previously played second fiddle to an acting dog, succeed to well in his very first major role. He is battling Ronald Colman for the heart of Vilma Banky. Poor girl. What a predicament.

(You can read my full-length review here.)

Availability: The Winning of Barbara Worth is available on DVD from Warner Archive. It was previously released as part of a high-end Gary Cooper box set but it also can be found for sale by its lonesome. Either version is very good.

Fun Size Review: The Winning of Barbara Worth (1926)

 winning of barbara worth

A western. Starring Vilma Banky and Ronald Colman. Only in the silents, eh? This is the story of how water was brought to the Imperial Valley and it also concerns the romance of Vilma’s Barbara. She just can’t decide between Ronald Colman and Gary Cooper. Poor lamb. I am sure a large section of the audience would kill for that plight. Well-produced but rather bloated. The climactic flood is justly famous.

If it were a desert it would be:

(via Pillssbury)
(via Pillssbury)

Lemon Curd Jumbo Pie Cupcakes. Very bright, very yellow, a bit overdone but generally a good thing.

You can read my full-length review here.

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The Winning of Barbara Worth (1926) A Silent Film Review

Vilma Banky takes on the title role of this Western-set tale of settlers, dams, floods and legal shenanigans. Banky is the prettiest girl in Imperial county. Ronald Colman is the corporate raider from the east who falls for her. A very young Gary Cooper is the local boy who hopes to win her heart. So, just who does win Barbara Worth?
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