Shelfie: Colleen Moore, Louise Brooks and Stencil Color

I’m back with another peek into my silent movie collection. If you want to catch up on other “shelfie” posts, you can find them here.

I’m based in California, so these films are quite possibly region 1. Readers living outside the region will need to make sure they have a region-free player before grabbing one of these titles.

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Silent Movie Villains: Which Baddies Do You Love to Hate?

Sure, heroes are great and if we didn’t have them, who would arrive in the TA-DA nick to time? But a hero is only as good as the villain they battle. Silent movie villains are often written off as Victorian melodrama stock characters with mustaches and top hats. We know that reality is different and now is our chance to share our REAL favorite baddies.

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Silent Stars Share Their Favorite Camera Angles: Colleen Moore, Buster Keaton, Hoot Gibson and More

I stumbled across this amusing piece in a 1926 issue of Photoplay Magazine. Most movie fans know that stars often had a side of their face that they preferred or a camera angle that they thought flattered them. Well, here’s the skinny on some of the biggest silent stars! All ready? Let’s go!

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Behind the Door (1919) A Silent Film Review

Captain Oscar Krug is a German-American taxidermist who has a secret behind his door and the whole gruesome story unspools in this post-WWI film. Nobody involved in the production seemed to understand that the war was over but the shocking content has made this picture a festival staple and a tidy way to prove that the silent era was not all innocence, light and naïve melodrama.

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Screenwriting Advice from Jesse Lasky: How to Sell a Picture to Paramount in 1921

Since we had so much fun with the last bit of movie writing advice, I thought we would go for more of the same. This article found in The Photodramatist of 1921 is of particular interest because it was written by Jesse Lasky, one of the founding players of what would/had become Paramount Pictures. Let’s see what our friend Mr. Lasky has to say about writing for one of his productions.

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Five Films Made Before 1910 That Deserve More Love

Excuse the bossy title but “I think you’ll really enjoy them because they surprised and delighted me” seemed a bit long. But that’s the gist of this post. I think 1910s cinema needs more love but pre-1910 is even more of a graveyard sometimes, except for Melies and some Edison. Well, let’s change that! Here are five films from the era that I think are worth your time.

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