Fun Size Review: Sweet Alyssum (1915)

Tyrone Power, Sr. made the jump from stage to screen and this is one of his earliest surviving roles. The plot is just nuts in that unique, unvarnished 1910s kind of way.

It starts out as a morality play, complete with a silky seducer and a wayward wife, before turning into a story about oil wells and a framed bank clerk on the run. However, Power does not disappoint and fans of his famous son will likely enjoy seeing him in action.

How does it end? Hover or tap below for a spoiler.
This is gonna take some time… Power’s wayward wife kills herself, his daughter grows up and dreams the location of an oil strike. Now rich, the daughter marries her framed bank clerk but then he turns out to be the son of the silky seducer from act one. But soon all is forgiven after his daughter throws her baby in the path of her father’s shotgun blast. Trust me, it doesn’t make any more sense in the film.

If it were a dessert it would be: Ham and Banana Casserole. Tries to combine too many ideas and just ends up confusing the heck out of everyone.

(You can read my full-length review here.)

Availability: Released on DVD by Grapevine.

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4 Replies to “Fun Size Review: Sweet Alyssum (1915)”

  1. Maybe this sounds daft, but that expression on his face is so natural.
    You’d never know the other Tyrone Power was his son, though, would you? Mrs. P. must have been a beauty!

  2. I had noticed too that Ty Sr. doesn’t have his son’s gorgeous looks, even though there’s some resemblance. (But Jr’s son, who sadly never knew his dad, certainly did inherit the gorgeous genes!)
    Also not too much father-son resemblance with the two Jason Robards, Clark and John Clark Gable, and Osgood and Anthony Perkins.

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