Fun Size Review: The Lost World (1925)

More fun than a barrel of lizards! This is one of the grandest special effects fests of the silent era. The plot involves a group of intrepid scientists who discover dinosaurs on a remote plateau, so you know this will have lots of prehistoric fun.

The talent includes Lewis Stone, Lloyd Hughes, Wallace Beery and Bessie Love plus a zany monkey but, let’s face it, we are here for the dinos and they do not disappoint. Ideal for the young and young at heart.

How does it end? Hover or tap below for a spoiler.
Noble sacrifice means that the young lovers can be together. Oh, and everyone thinks it’s a swell idea to take a dinosaur back to London. It escapes and flounces off, destroying half the city in the process. Whoopsy. Don’t worry, the dino lives.

Read my full-length review here.

If it were a dessert it would be: Dinosaur Nests. Tasty treats for the inner kid.

Availability: Avoid the low quality releases and get either the DVD from Flicker Alley or their new and stunning restoration on Bluray.

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6 Replies to “Fun Size Review: The Lost World (1925)”

  1. I believe I mentioned this briefly in some earlier comment but I would like to expand on it here.

    I, too, was introduced to the silent “Lost World” by means of a documentary. Along with 8mm Castle Films cartoons & butchered strips of Chaplin, Elmo Lincoln, & Tom Mix, I grew up with a 400′ version of it originally released to schools by the Encyclopedia Britannica, & later in the 40s to the home market on 8mm. The emphasis was on the dinos (of course!) with educational titles replacing the originals & all trace of plot entirely obscured. This suited me fine at the time–I’m not sure I saw any longer version until the coming of TCM. I remember running it on my projector for guests as late as the 70s.

    And I’m also partial to the animation in the film, tho’ I’m not sure why, as I love “King Kong.” It may be owing to my dear childhood memories of that old “educational” version: so much fun to read the academic title cards, complete with phonetic pronunciations, solemnly explaining those human-like, sneering dinos!

  2. One of my favorite silent films! Great special effects, and you got Lewis Stone, Wallace Berry, and Bessie Love doing what they do. The blu-ray is great.

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