Silent Movie People Deal with Ice and Snow (Brrr!)

Silent movies were often shot outside in less-than-ideal circumstances, either by choice, by accident or because it simply could not be avoided. But whether the snow was real or fake, silent movies loved their winter scenes.

We start with some of the most authentic snow you will ever see, the 1909 Russian winter captured on film in Moscow Clad in Snow.

Read my review here.

Available on DVD.

Charlie Chaplin’s production of The Gold Rush started in Truckee, California before moving back to the studio and snow made of salt and flour.

Read my review here.

Available on DVD and Bluray.

More of the real deal in South, the documentary of Ernest Shackleton’s Endurance expedition with actual footage shot in Antarctica.

Read my review here.

Available on DVD.

Boo! Marion Davies has a frosted face and it provides one of the best creepy/funny gags in The Red Mill.

Read my review here.

Available on DVD.

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4 Replies to “Silent Movie People Deal with Ice and Snow (Brrr!)”

  1. You decided to forget one of the most obvious scenes, the over melodramatic ending of Way Down East. But snow has been photographed better by Julius Jaenzon in Mauritz Stiller’s and Victor Sjöström’s films. In particular Sir Arne’s Treasure is all about snow and ice and worth of seeing even if one isn’t a fan of Selma Lagerlöf’s stories.

      1. Oh, not even a silent movie can ever match the pleasure of skiing in a forest where snow covers the trees and damps all noise.

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