Silent Movie Stars Deliver a Swift Kick in the Pants

Sometimes, the best way to deal with a situation is to deliver a good, swift kick. That’s exactly what these silent stars do.

Let’s start with an amusingly animated title card from the Enid Bennett drama The Woman in the Suitcase. No physical kick but the next best thing.

Read my review here.

Available on DVD.

The Oz films produced by L. Frank Baum are definitely unique and The Magic Cloak of Oz features some of the weirder sequences with soup fanciers attempting to take over a city. They didn’t figure on a pantomime donkey.

Read my review here.

Available on DVD and Bluray.

Bessie Love delivers a swift kick in the pants as the heroine of the supremely weird The Mystery of the Leaping Fish.

Read my review here.

Available on DVD.

Mary Pickford demonstrates her ability with plate-kicking. Impressive height considering that heavy beaded skirt!

Read my review here.

Available on DVD.

We are all the grumpy little rabbit in Bully for Pink.

Read my review here.

Available on DVD and Bluray.

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12 Replies to “Silent Movie Stars Deliver a Swift Kick in the Pants”

  1. I’m so glad you included The Dream- a personal favorite. What an amazing kick!

    Any period clothing geek (proud card carrying one here!) who has ever shopped/browsed in antique clothing stores knows those period skirts can appear ethereal but in fact be so heavy. Many are not nearly as full as Mary’s either (didn’t name them “hobble” skirts for nothing). There were two shops near where I once lived, Rebecca’s Dream and LaRue’s Clothes of Yesteryear, that had such items in glass cases on display (no touching, too fragile-and pricey-I suppose), but the ones out for the customers to look at were wonderful. One satin dress I remember had swirls down the front and sides of the skirt made, not from sequins, but heavy glass beads. Bravo to Mary for that swift, high kick performed while wearing such a costume ๐Ÿ˜€

  2. I’ll bet that turned out to be one beautiful dress- lovely pattern!

    But, all that AND hem weights?!?!?! No wonder the fabric always hangs so beautifully (at the wearer’s expense, of course). Who can wonder that 1920s fashions for women (from underwear to outerwear) were found to be so liberating!

  3. Sorry about wasted ‘test’ message earlier. (Trying out a new tablet.) I, too, love vintage films for the close look they give us of the period clothes. So much better seeing them on people, ‘in motion,’ than just in photos or hanging on mannequins in a museum.

    Does anyone know when pajamas started being worn, instead of nightshirts and gowns?

    1. Oh, no worries at all! I know how it is with new technology.

      I’m not sure about the pajamas. I do know that I see them on men and women in the 1910s but I am not sure if I remember seeing them in the 1900s (though that means nothing as there are many 1900s film I haven’t seen).

  4. Interesting to see Miss Love’s kick miss the mark. This would never have done for high-kicking Mabel Normand – witness her kicks, delivered with huge tramps shoes, dished out to ‘con-genial’ Charlie’s rear in Mabel’s Busy Day. Next time Mabel don’t show us your bloomers!

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