Silent Movie Stars React to Movies

One of the great pleasures of covering silent movies is breaking it to these whippersnappers that satire and meta humor are not modern inventions. (Sorry, Gen X.) We’re going to prove it with some silent movie people reacting to movies.

The whole concept of Mel Brooks’s 1976 Silent Movie is that it’s a silent movie about people trying to make a silent movie. And, of course, people being horrified at the concept of a silent movie in a silent movie.

Read my review here.

The film is available on DVD as a solo flick or on Bluray as part of a box set.

In Are Parents People, Adolphe Menjou has no time for Florence Vidor’s plans to confront the movie sheik they think is dating their daughter. Women! Feh! (It’s worth pointing out that during the silent era, women were indeed the coveted moviegoing audience. So instead of the Marvel Extended Universe, we could have had the Strawberry Shortcake Cinematic Universe, if such attention to women had continued. I for one mourn the SSCU.)

Read my review here.

Available on DVD.

Okay, let’s first say that Uno Henning’s invitation is turned down in A Cottage on Dartmoor not so much due to a dislike of talkies as the fact that he is a creepy stalker (who later cuts her fiance’s throat). The movie does feature an extended theater sequence comparing silent films to talkies.

Read my review here.

Available on DVD.

The fact that silent dramas are often ignored in favor of comedy is nothing new. William Haines has zero desire to see some soppy romance in Show People but Marion Davies won’t have it.

Read my review here.

Available on DVD.

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8 Replies to “Silent Movie Stars React to Movies”

  1. Great GIFS all, particularly Show People!

    OT: my dream silent star biopic series on Masterpiece has always been Billy Haines (followed closely by Pola Negri, Leatrice Joy, Viola Dana, and Thomas Ince). The fictitious machinations and travails of Downton Abbey v. the real life machinations of early Hollywood? No contest πŸ˜‰

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