Video Review: The Beloved Rogue (1927)

John Barrymore gnaws on the scenery in this zany medieval action-comedy. The Beloved Rogue was his first film for United Artists and it was also the American debut of Conrad Veidt. Veidt and Barrymore compete to see who can overact more shamelessly. I think it is too close to call.

A ton of fun, truly.

You can also read my print review here.

Availability

Released on DVD by Kino Lorber.

Sources

The House of Barrymore by Margot Peters

Good Night, Sweet Prince: The Life and Times of John Barrymore by Gene Fowler

Conrad Veidt on Screen: A Comprehensive Illustrated Filmography by John T. Soister

The Lives of the Kings & Queens of France by Duc de Castries

Poems by Francois Villon

Encyclopedia Britannica: Francois Villon (online version)

12 Replies to “Video Review: The Beloved Rogue (1927)”

  1. Cool video, Fritzi, and nice work on the production side of it! I have a question: I noticed three different colors/tints to that movie: blue, black-and-white, and sepia. Did the film actually contain these three tints, or were these clips from three different source prints?

    1. Thank you, glad you liked it!
      The tints are all from the same print. Silent movies often used numerous tints to set the mood. Dark blue for night, light blue for winter, rose for romance, yellow for desert sun, sepia for daylight and candlelight, lavender and green for eeriness… This film is set in a medieval winter so there is a lot of blue and sepia for snow and candlelight.

      1. I stumbled onto him through a number of films that just happened to star him. He was amazing in all of them: The Last Performance, The Hands of Orlac, The Student of Prague and of course The Man Who Laughs.

      2. Could not agree more! I also recommend The Indian Tomb. Long but worth the effort. Plus, you get to see him painted gold. That’s worth something, eh? πŸ˜‰

      3. I see that it’s shorter than Dr. Mabuse, der Spieler, which is the film by which I judge running times πŸ™‚ Gold, silver, bronze, brass, cobolt – all fine by me as long as it’s Veidt.

  2. I see that lady practices the Daniel Plainview style of parenting.

    This movie looks like quite the production, with sets, costumes and photography. I don’t think I’ve watched anything with John Barrymore. Perhaps I’ve associated him with stuffy romantic dramas, but I can’t pin-point why. The Beloved Rogue looks like fun, though.

    Oh, and, “Yipes! And away!” πŸ˜‰

    1. In all fairness, Barrymore did make his share of stuffy romances. Much romancing the lady while turned sideways However, “The Beloved Rogue” and “Tempest” are two of my all-time favorite silents.

      Where do you think Daffy got his schtick? πŸ˜‰

  3. I saw this film about three years ago and I still think about it from time to time. Your video is a real treat and an impressive production! I love both those actors and recently watched MIDNIGHT (I know it’s not a silent) for the fourth time. Barrymore is the highlight.

    1. Thank you! Yes, I enjoyed MIDNIGHT as well. It was delightful to see Barrymore reunited with Mary Astor one last time.

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